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Valentine’s Day is a 2010 American romantic comedy film directed by Garry Marshall. The screenplay was written by Katherine Fugate from a story by Fugate, Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein.

The film features one of the largest all-star ensemble casts in Hollywood history, starring Ashton Kutcher, Julia Roberts, Bradley Cooper, Jessica Alba, Patrick Dempsey, Alex Williams, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Biel, Jamie Foxx, Jennifer Garner, George Lopez, Hector Elizondo, Kathy Bates, Emma Roberts, Carter Jenkins, Bryce Robinson, Taylor Swift, Taylor Lautner, Eric Dane, Queen Latifah, Shirley MacLaine, and Topher Grace.

It’s Valentine’s Day in Los Angeles, florist Reed Bennett (Ashton Kutcher) proposes to his girlfriend Morley (Jessica Alba) who accepts, much to the surprise of Reed’s closest friends Alphonso (George Lopez) and Julia Fitzpatrick (Jennifer Garner). Morley changes her mind and leaves Reed later in the day. Alphonso tells Reed he and Julia knew it would never work out between him and Morley, and Reed wishes they had told him. On an airplane to Los Angeles, Kate Hazeltine (Julia Roberts), a captain in the U.S. Army on a one-day leave, befriends newly single Holden Wilson (Bradley Cooper). Kate and Holden chat, play backgammon, and tell jokes. When the plane lands, and Kate has to wait hours for the taxi, Holden offers his limousine, which Kate accepts, as she only has one day to spend with her family before she has to go back to the army.

Julia, an elementary school teacher has fallen in love with Dr. Harrison Copeland (Patrick Dempsey), but does not know that he is married to his wife Pamela (Katherine LaNasa). Reed finds out when Harrison orders flowers for his wife and girlfriend (Julia). Harrison tells her that he needs to go to San Francisco for a business trip. Wanting to surprise him and following Reed’s advice from earlier on in the day, Julia buys a plane ticket to San Francisco. Reed quickly comes to the airport and warns Julia, and she refuses to believe it and gets on the plane. She goes to the hospital where he said he would be, and inquires after him. The nurses at the counter reveal to her that he is married and tell her the name of the restaurant where he and his wife will be dining that evening. As she teaches the owner’s son, the owner allows her to dress as a waitress. Julia makes a scene at the restaurant, and gives back the toy Harrison gave her that morning. Harrison’s wife, Pamela, becomes suspicious when Julia makes a comment referring to Harrison’s ability to juggle, and Harrison is seen eating pizza alone in a condo later on that evening, implying that Pamela has left him right after Julia’s scene. One of Julia’s students, Edison (Bryce Robinson), orders flowers from Reed, to be sent to his teacher. There is a delay in the delivery of flowers, but Edison insists that Reed delivers the flowers the same day. They are for Julia; however, she suggests to Edison to give the flowers to a lonely girl in the class who also has a crush on him, which he does.

Edison’s babysitter Grace (Emma Roberts) is planning to lose her virginity with her boyfriend Alex (Carter Jenkins). The planned encounter goes awry when Grace’s mom discovers a naked Alex in Grace’s room rehearsing a song he wrote for Grace on his guitar. Meanwhile Edison’s grandparents, Edgar (Hector Elizondo) and Estelle (Shirley MacLaine) are facing the troubles of a long marriage. Grace explains to them that she wants to have sex with Alex, and says, “It’s not like I am going to sleep with one person for the rest of my life.” This upsets Estelle and leads to her telling Edgar about an affair she had with one of his business partners. The affair was while he was away, and it didn’t last long. Although she is deeply sorry for what she did, Edgar is deeply upset. Grace’s high-school friends, Willy (Taylor Lautner) and Felicia (Taylor Swift), are experiencing the freshness of new love, and have agreed to wait to have sex. On Valentine’s Day, Willy gives Felicia a large white bear that she carries around with her everywhere and Felicia gets him a gray running t-shirt (which was his) and ironed the number 13 on the back for “good luck”. They are interviewed on the news and advertise their love and support for each other.

Sean Jackson (Eric Dane), a closeted gay professional football player, is contemplating the end of his career together with his publicist Kara (Jessica Biel) and his agent Paula (Queen Latifah). Kara, a close friend of Julia’s, is organizing her annual “I Hate Valentine’s Day” party, but is becoming interested in sports reporter Kelvin Moore (Jamie Foxx) who has been sent out by his producer Susan (Kathy Bates) to cover Valentine’s Day because of a lack of sports news, and they share their mutual hatred of Valentine’s Day. Paula has hired a new receptionist named Liz (Anne Hathaway) who has started dating mailroom clerk Jason (Topher Grace). Jason is first shocked when Liz turns out to be moonlighting as a phone sex operator. Liz explains that she is only doing this because she has a $100,000 student loan to pay off, has no health insurance, and is completely broke. Jason decides that her job is too much for him to handle, but eventually comes back to the relationship after seeing Edgar forgive his wife, Estelle.

Sean comes out on national television, and Holden (who is Sean’s lover) goes back to him. Kate goes home to greet her son Edison. Willy drops Felicia off at home after a date and they kiss goodnight. Kelvin and Kara hang out at Kelvin’s news station where they later kiss, Alfonso dines with his wife, Grace and Alex agree to wait to have sex, Edgar and Estelle retell each other their marriage vows and kiss in the theater, Jason goes back to Liz and they decide to keep a bond together but to also “keep it simple”, Morley is shown walking her Border collie while trying to call Reed and the movie closes with Julia and Reed beginning a relationship.

Cappuccino Truffle

(3 pieces)

Dark Chocolate Truffle

(4 pieces)

Double Chocolate Raspberry Truffle

(4 pieces)

Extra Dark Chocolate Truffle

(4 pieces)

French Vanilla Truffle

(4 pieces)

Hazelnut Praliné Truffle

(4 pieces)

Milk Chocolate Truffle

(4 pieces)

Roasted Almond Truffle

(4 pieces)

Smooth Coconut Truffle

(3 pieces)

Strawberry Truffle

(2 pieces)

36 pc. Valentine’s Day Signature Truffles

$67.00

Godiva signature chocolate truffles deliver romance and love in every luscious bite. This assortment includes our most delicious truffles in Extra Dark Chocolate, Hazelnut Pralinè, Double Chocolate Raspberry, Smooth Coconut, French Vanilla, Cappuccino, Strawberry, and more. Finished for Valentine’s Day in our signature box, with an elegant red ribbon. 36 pcs. (1 lb., 8.75 oz.)Discounts may vary for corporate distributors.

NEW 32 pc Limited Edition Godiva Gems Milk and Dark Chocolate Strawberry Truffles

$18.00

Blissful bites of Godiva milk and dark chocolate go incognito, wrapped as sweet strawberries. Bite in, and notice how these little gems melt in your mouth, and finish with a creamy strawberry mousse. Unwrap a little Godiva – for Valentine’s Day. 32 pcs. (10.2 oz.)

NEW Dark Chocolate Message Heart – I Love You

$8.00

You can boldly express your affection with this dark chocolate “I Love You” heart. It’s wrapped up in cellophane, and tied with a big red bow, just for Valentine’s Day. 4″ tall, 1 pc. (3.5 oz.)

NEW Milk Chocolate Message Heart – HUG

$8.00

You can boldly express your affection with this milk chocolate “Hug” heart. It’s wrapped up in cellophane, and tied with a big red bow, just for Valentine’s Day. 4″ tall, 1 pc. (3.5 oz.)

 

NEW Milk Chocolate Heart – LOVE

$8.00 Show your affection with this milk chocolate “Love” heart. It’s wrapped up in cellophane, and tied with a big red bow, just for Valentine’s Day. 4″ tall, 1 pc. (3.5 oz.)

NEW Sweet Hearts Gift Set

$50.00

Show your sweetheart your love with our Sweet Hearts Gift Set. Includes our True Love Heart Box, with a beautiful assortment of chocolate sensations in fine milk, dark, and white pieces. It’s accompanied by Valentino the Bear, our plush bear designed exclusively by Gund© for Godiva. He arrives with an organza bag of six foil-wrapped, solid milk chocolate hearts. He wears a chic red beret and sweater, and has “Godiva 2011″ embroidered on his paw. About 8 1/2” tall when sitting. Bear intended for ages 3 and up. 21 pcs. (7.1 oz.)


Other Options Available:

NEW 15 pc. Romantic Heart Assortment

$40.00

Reveal your heart’s desire with a gorgeous satin heart, strewn with red roses, and filled with a heart-stopping array of our classic pieces. Tucked inside are our Limited Edition heart chocolates inspired by champagne cocktails – Bellini, Mimosa, Classic, and Rosé. Love is grand! 15 pcs. (5 oz.)


    We offer our Corporate Customers the attractive feature of a quantity discount, ensuring Godiva chocolates are the affordable luxury:

NEW Valentine’s Day Chocolate Heart Lollipop

$6.00 Item #74764

For all your loved ones – delight them with our delectably delicious heart-shaped milk chocolate lollipop. Let them know they are always close to your heart. Tied with a red satin bow. (1.4 oz.)

Dark Caramel Embrace

(1 piece)

Dark Ganache Bliss

(1 piece)

Milk Praliné Heart

(1 piece)

Raspberry Star

(1 piece)

White Favor with White Ribbon and Silver Heart Charm (4 pc.)

$7.50 Item #190065

A memorable finale for your next soirée. Includes our Dark Chocolate Ganache Bliss, Milk Chocolate Praliné Heart, Dark Chocolate Caramel Embrace, and White Chocolate Raspberry Star. In a crisp white box finished with white ribbon and heart charm. 4 pcs. (1.6 oz.)

NEW Dark Truffle Heart

(12 pieces)

Other Options Available:

 40 pc. Romantic Heart Assortment

Reveal your heart’s desire this Valentine’s Day with a gorgeous satin heart, strewn with red roses, and filled with a heart-stopping array of our classic pieces. Tucked inside are our Limited Edition heart chocolates inspired by champagne cocktails – Bellini, Mimosa, Classic, and Rosé. Love is grand! 40 pcs. (1 lb., 8 oz.)

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50% Dark Demitasse

(3 pieces)

Almond Crunch

(1 piece)

Almond Praliné Raindrop

(1 piece)

Cherry Cordial

(1 piece)

Cinnamon Blush

(1 piece)

Coconut Pyramid

(2 pieces)

Coffee Feather

(1 piece)

Dark Caramel Embrace

(2 pieces)

Dark Ganache Bliss

(1 piece)

Dark Ganache Heart

(1 piece)

Dark Lion of Belgium

(1 piece)

Dark Mint Medallion

(2 pieces)

Macadamia Mosaic

(1 piece)

Midnight Swirl

(2 pieces)

Milk Caramel Embrace

(2 pieces)

Milk Demitasse

(2 pieces)

Milk Ganache Bliss

(1 piece)

Milk Lion of Belgium

(1 piece)

Milk Praliné Heart

(1 piece)

Open Oyster

(1 piece)

Pecan Caramel Duet

(1 piece)

Pecan Crunch

(1 piece)

Praliné Crescent

(1 piece)

Raspberry Ganache Twirl

(1 piece)

Raspberry Star

(1 piece)

White Ganache Bliss

(1 piece)

White Praliné Heart

(1 piece)

 

NEW 36 pc. Valentine’s Day Ballotin

True love endures. And so does the desire for Godiva chocolate. Show your affection this Valentine’s Day with a distinctive ballotin assortment of all our most fabled confections – sumptuous pralinés, buttery caramels, intense ganaches, plus fruit and nuts enrobed in the finest milk, dark, and white chocolate. Tied with a red satin ribbon crowned by a red rose pin, a perfect Valentine’s Day gift. 36 pcs. (14.6 oz.)

NEW Set of 3 Message Hearts – Love, Hug, and I Love You

$24.00 $20.00
You can boldly express your affection with these three chocolate message hearts. “Hug” and “Love” in Milk Chocolate, and “I Love You” in Dark Chocolate. Each heart is individually wrapped up in cellophane, and tied with a big red bow, just for Valentine’s Day. 4″ tall, 3 pcs. (3.5 oz. each)

NEW Exclusive Gund® 2011 Valentino the Bear

$25.00 Ooh-la la! This year, our soft, plush collector’s bear dresses in a chic beret and red sweater. Created exclusively by Gund® for Godiva with “2011” embroidered on one paw. His red organza bag holds 8 foil-wrapped milk chocolate hearts – a final sweet touch. 8 ½” tall. Ages 3 and up. 8 pcs. (1.5 oz.)

NEW 15 pc. True Love Heart Gift Box

When it comes to love – and chocolate – it’s what’s inside that counts. So treat all your loved ones to this heart-felt assortment – luscious pralinés, rich ganaches, buttery caramels, fruits and nuts in our legendary milk, dark, and white chocolate. 15 pcs. (5.6 oz)

50% Dark Demitasse

(6 pieces)

72% Dark Demitasse

(2 pieces)

Cappuccino Truffle

(1 piece)

Cherry Cordial

(1 piece)

Coconut Pyramid

(1 piece)

Dark Caramel Embrace

(1 piece)

Dark Chocolate Truffle

(1 piece)

Dark Ganache Bliss

(2 pieces)

Dark Ganache Heart

(1 piece)

Dark Lion of Belgium

(2 pieces)

Dark Mint Medallion

(2 pieces)

Double Chocolate Raspberry Truffle

(1 piece)

French Vanilla Truffle

(1 piece)

Midnight Swirl

(1 piece)

Mochacinno Mousse Dessert Chocolat

(1 piece)

Raspberry Caramel Duet

(2 pieces)

Raspberry Ganache Twirl

(1 piece)

 

NEW 27 pc. Dark Chocolate Valentine’s Day Gift Box

$36.00

Send your Valentine into a state of sheer bliss with a classic assortment of legendary Godiva dark chocolate. Our assortment includes Dark Caramel Embrace, Midnight Swirl, Dark Ganache Bliss, Dark Chocolate Raspberry Truffle, 72% Dark Demitasse, Mochaccino Mousse Dessert Chocolat and other Godiva dark chocolate indulgences. It’s finished with a red ribbon and trim for Valentine’s Day. 27 pcs. (10.6 oz.)

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NEW Valentine’s Day Chocolate Heart Lollipop – Set of 3

$18.00 $15.00 For all your loved ones – delight them with our delectably delicious heart-shaped milk chocolate lollipop. Let them know they are always close to your heart. Tied with a red satin bow. Special Value – Set of 3. (1.4 oz. each)

NEW Large Foil-Wrapped Milk Chocolate Heart

$20.00

Win their affection with this large 3 dimensional heart of semi-solid milk chocolate. Wrapped in red foil, it’s a chocolate lover’s dream come true. 5.5″ tall, and tied in cellophane with a beautiful red ribbon. 1 pc. (7 oz.)

NEW 32 pc Gems Sweetheart Message Milk and Dark Chocolate Truffles

$18.00

Can’t think of the words you want to say to your Valentine? How about letting Godiva express it for you. Our famous bite-size, melt-in-your-mouth milk and dark chocolate truffles come wrapped in classic Valentine’s messages. They arrive in a cellophane bag, and are perfect for your candy dish, or for giving to that special someone. Talk about sweet talk! 32 pcs. (11.75 oz.)

Esther Howland Valentine, circa 1850: “Weddings now are all the go, Will you marry me or no”

Handwritten poem, “To Susanna” dated Valentine’s Day, 1850 (Cork, Ireland)

Comic Valentine, mid-19th century: “R stands for rod, which can give a smart crack, And ought to be used For a day on your back.”

Valentine card, 1862: “My dearest Miss, I send thee a kiss” addressed to Miss Jenny Lane of Crostwight Hall, Smallburgh, Norfolk.

Folk art Valentine and envelope dated 1875 addressed to Clara Dunn of Newfield, New Jersey

Whitney Valentine, 1887; Howland sold her New England Valentine Company to the George C. Whitney Company in 1881

Seascape Valentine, date unknown

Vinegar Valentine, circa 1900

Buster Brown Valentine postcard by Richard Felton Outcault, early years of 20th century

Advertisement for Prang’s greeting cards, 1883

Postcard by Nister, circa 1906

Valentine postcard, circa 1900–1910

A tiny 2-inch pop-up Valentine, circa 1920

Football-playing Disney-like rat and bulldog are set in motion by the pull-tab on the right, circa 1920

A grommet affixed to the center of the card permits the dog’s eyes to glance side-to-side when the blue bow is moved

Rocking horse and rider, circa 1920–1930

Children’s Valentine, 1940–1950

Anthropomorphic Valentine, circa 1950–1960

In 1797, a British publisher issued The Young Man’s Valentine Writer, which contained scores of suggested sentimental verses for the young lover unable to compose his own. Printers had already begun producing a limited number of cards with verses and sketches, called “mechanical valentines,” and a reduction in postal rates in the next century ushered in the less personal but easier practice of mailing Valentines. That, in turn, made it possible for the first time to exchange cards anonymously, which is taken as the reason for the sudden appearance of racy verse in an era otherwise prudishly Victorian.

Paper Valentines became so popular in England in the early 19th century that they were assembled in factories. Fancy Valentines were made with real lace and ribbons, with paper lace introduced in the mid-19th century. In the UK, just under half the population spend money on their Valentines and around 1.3 billion pounds is spent yearly on cards, flowers, chocolates and other gifts, with an estimated 25 million cards being sent. The reinvention of Saint Valentine’s Day in the 1840s has been traced by Leigh Eric Schmidt. As a writer in Graham’s American Monthly observed in 1849, “Saint Valentine’s Day… is becoming, nay it has become, a national holyday.” In the United States, the first mass-produced valentines of embossed paper lace were produced and sold shortly after 1847 by Esther Howland (1828–1904) of Worcester, Massachusetts.

Her father operated a large book and stationery store, but Howland took her inspiration from an English Valentine she had received from a business associate of her father. Intrigued with the idea of making similar Valentines, Howland began her business by importing paper lace and floral decorations from England. The English practice of sending Valentine’s cards was established enough to feature as a plot device in Elizabeth Gaskell‘s Mr. Harrison’s Confessions (1851): “I burst in with my explanations: ‘”The valentine I know nothing about.” ‘”It is in your handwriting,” said he coldly. Since 2001, the Greeting Card Association has been giving an annual “Esther Howland Award for a Greeting Card Visionary.”

Since the 19th century, handwritten notes have largely given way to mass-produced greeting cards. The mid-19th century Valentine’s Day trade was a harbinger of further commercialized holidays in the United States to follow.

In the second half of the 20th century, the practice of exchanging cards was extended to all manner of gifts in the United States. Such gifts typically include roses and chocolates packed in a red satin, heart-shaped box. In the 1980s, the diamond industry began to promote Valentine’s Day as an occasion for giving jewelry. The day has come to be associated with a generic platonic greeting of “Happy Valentine’s Day.” As a joke, Valentine’s Day is also referred to as “Singles Awareness Day“. In some North American elementary schools, children decorate classrooms, exchange cards, and eat sweets. The greeting cards of these students sometimes mention what they appreciate about each other.

The U.S. Greeting Card Association estimates that approximately 190 million valentines are sent each year in the US. Half of those valentines are given to family members other than husband or wife, usually to children. When you include the valentine-exchange cards made in school activities the figure goes up to 1 billion, and teachers become the people receiving the most valentines.

The rise of Internet popularity at the turn of the millennium is creating new traditions. Millions of people use, every year, digital means of creating and sending Valentine’s Day greeting messages such as e-cards, love coupons or printable greeting cards. About 15 million e-valentines will have been sent in 2010.

There are some families, however, who choose to find other means of honoring Saint Valentine on Valentine’s Day. Many of these traditions involve bonfires, for fire is said to represent passion.

Using the language of the law courts for the rituals of courtly love, a “High Court of Love” was established in Paris on Valentine’s Day in 1400. The court dealt with love contracts, betrayals, and violence against women. Judges were selected by women on the basis of a poetry reading. The earliest surviving valentine is a 15th-century rondeau written by Charles, Duke of Orleans to his wife, which commences.

Je suis desja d’amour tanné
Ma tres doulce Valentinée…
—Charles d’Orléans
At the time, the duke was being held in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt, 1415.

Valentine’s Day is mentioned ruefully by Ophelia in Hamlet (1600–1601):

To-morrow is Saint Valentine’s day,
All in the morning betime,
And I a maid at your window,
To be your Valentine.
Then up he rose, and donn’d his clothes,
And dupp’d the chamber-door;
Let in the maid, that out a maid
Never departed more.
—William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5

John Donne used the legend of the marriage of the birds as the starting point for his Epithalamion celebrating the marriage of Elizabeth, daughter of James I of England, and Frederick V, Elector Palatine on Valentine’s Day:

Hayle Bishop Valentine whose day this is
All the Ayre is thy Diocese
And all the chirping Queristers
And other birds ar thy parishioners
Thou marryest every yeare
The Lyrick Lark, and the graue whispering Doue,
The Sparrow that neglects his life for loue,
The houshold bird with the redd stomacher
Thou makst the Blackbird speede as soone,
As doth the Goldfinch, or the Halcyon
The Husband Cock lookes out and soone is spedd
And meets his wife, which brings her feather-bed.
This day more cheerfully than ever shine
This day which might inflame thy selfe old Valentine.
—John Donne, Epithalamion Vpon Frederick Count Palatine and the Lady Elizabeth marryed on St. Valentines day
 

The verse Roses are red echoes conventions traceable as far back as Edmund Spenser‘s epic The Faerie Queene (1590):

She bath’d with roses red, and violets blew,
And all the sweetest flowres, that in the forrest grew.

The modern cliché Valentine’s Day poem can be found in the collection of English nursery rhymes Gammer Gurton’s Garland (1784):

The rose is red, the violet’s blue
The honey’s sweet, and so are you
Thou are my love and I am thine
I drew thee to my Valentine
The lot was cast and then I drew
And Fortune said it shou’d be you.